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Welcome to
Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park

Location - Directions
The museum is located in northeastern Los Angeles County.  It is 19 miles east of the Antelope Valley Freeway (State Highway 14), at 15701 East Avenue M in Lancaster.  Go East on Avenue K to 150th Street East, go south on 150th for 2 miles.  Turn left on Ave. M, and go east for 1 mile to the museum.  Or exit Pearblossom Highway (138) at 165th Street East and travel north.  Bear right as 165th turns into 170th Street East. Continue north on 170th to Avenue M.  Turn left on Avenue M, and go west for 1 mile to the museum.

Latitude/Longitude: 34.650278, -117.848889 


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The Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park is a state historic park of California, USA, interpreting Native American cultures of the Great Basin and surrounding regions. The park and its grounds are situated on the Antelope Valley's rural east side in northern Los Angeles County, California.

The museum contains the combined collections of H. Arden Edwards and subsequent owner and anthropology student Grace Oliver. The exhibits represent and interpret Native Americans groups, both aboriginal and contemporary, of the Southwest, Great Basin, and Californian cultural regions. A number of the artifacts on display are rare or one-of-a-kind items.

The museum was originally constructed by homesteader/artist H. Arden Edwards in 1928. The chalet-style structure was built over the rock formation of Piute Butte in the Mojave Desert. The unusual folk art structure, originally used as a home, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Demonstrations and special events

Joshua Cottage features a "touch table" room where visitors can experience food grinding and processing techniques, or learn how earlier American Indians started fires using sticks or bow drills.

Outside the museum is a self-guided nature trail, a picnic area, and an outdoor ceremonial arena. Occasionally guest American Indian groups perform traditional dances and other programs. An annual opening event each fall features a traditional ground blessing ceremony. There are also American Indian artists demonstrating and selling their work, American Indian food, and special activities for children. The museum also sponsors periodic educational seminars.

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