Did You Know? Amazing Rock 'N Roll Facts
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Amazing Rock and Roll Facts

Key Artist: 1920sAlan's Rock & Roll FUN Trivia.  Trivia powered by ABE.

  • …that Trixie Smith (1895 – September 21, 1943) was an African American blues singer, recording artist, vaudeville entertainer, and actress. She made four dozen recordings.

  • …that Papa Charlie Jackson (born William Henry Jackson c. 1885 – 1938) was an early American bluesman and songster who accompanied himself variously with a hybrid banjo guitar, a guitar, or a ukulele. His recording career began in 1924. Much of his life remains a mystery, but it is probable that he was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, and died in Chicago, Illinois in 1938.

  • …that "Blind" Lemon Jefferson (born Lemon Henry Jefferson; September 24, 1893 – December 19, 1929) was an American blues singer and guitarist from Texas. He was one of the most popular blues singers of the 1920s, and has been titled "Father of the Texas Blues".

  • …that Uncle Dave Macon (born David Harrison Macon; October 7, 1870 – March 22, 1952), - also known as "The Dixie Dewdrop"—was an American banjo player, singer, songwriter, and comedian. He was known for his chin whiskers, plug hat, gold teeth, and gates-ajar collar, he gained regional fame as a vaudeville performer in the early 1920s before going on to become the first star of the Grand Ole Opry in the latter half of the decade.

  • …that Jim Jackson (c.1884 - 1937) was an African American blues and hokum singer, songster and guitarist, whose recordings in the late 1920s were popular and influential on later artists.

  • …that Ma Rainey (born Gertrude Pridgett; April 26, 1886 – December 22, 1939) was one of the earliest known American professional blues singers and one of the first generation of such singers to record. She was billed as The Mother of the Blues.

  • …that Tampa Red (born Hudson Woodbridge January 8, 1904 – March 19, 1981), but known from childhood as Hudson Whittaker, was an American Chicago blues musician.

  • …that Thomas Andrew Dorsey (July 1, 1899 – January 23, 1993) was known as "the father of black gospel music" and was at one time so closely associated with the field that songs written in the new style were sometimes known as "dorseys." Earlier in his life he was a leading blues pianist known as Georgia Tom.

  • …that Clarence Smith, better known as Pinetop Smith or Pine Top Smith (June 11, 1904 – March 15, 1929) was an American boogie-woogie style blues pianist. His hit tune, "Pine Top's Boogie Woogie," featured rhythmic "breaks" that were an essential ingredient of ragtime music.

  • …that Roosevelt Graves (December 9, 1909, Meridian, Mississippi – December 30, 1962, Gulfport, Mississippi) was an American blues guitarist and singer, who recorded both sacred and secular music in the 1920s and 1930s.

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